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What Colors Mean

Black

black

Black is the color of coal, ebony, and of outer space. It the darkest color, the result of the absence of or complete absorption of light. It is the opposite of white.

Black was one of the first colors used by artists in neolithic cave paintings. In the Roman Empire, it became the color of mourning, and over the centuries it was frequently associated with death, evil, witches and magic. In the 14th century, it began to be worn by royalty, the clergy, judges and government officials in much of Europe. It became the color worn by English romantic poets, businessmen and statesmen in the 19th century, and a high fashion color in the 20th century.

In the Western World today, it is the color most commonly associated with mourning, the end, secrets, magic, power, violence, evil, and elegance.


* The ancient Egyptians and Romans used black for mourning, as do most people today.

 

* The “Blackshirts”‌ were the security troops in Hitler's German army, also known as the S.S.

 

* Black often stands for secrecy.

 

* A “blackhearted”‌ person is evil.

 

* If a business is “in the black,”‌ it is making money.

 

* A “blacklist”‌ is a list of persons or organizations to be boycotted or punished.

 

* Black is associated with sophistication and elegance. A “black tie”‌ event is formal.

 

* A black belt in karate identifies an expert.

 

* A black flag in a car race is the signal for a driver to go to the pits.

 

* Black lung is a coal miner's disease caused by the frequent inhaling of coal dust.

 

* Blackmail is getting things by threat.

 

* Black market is illegal trade in goods or money.

 

* A black sheep is an outcast.

 

* “Blackwash”‌ (as opposed to “whitewash”‌) is to uncover or bring out in the light.

 

* A blackout is a period of darkness from the loss of electricity, for protection against nighttime air raids, or, in the theater, to separate scenes in a play.

 

* When you “black out,”‌ you temporarily lose consciousness.


Source:

factmonster.com

encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com


Other Links:

What Colors Mean: Blue

What Colors Mean: Violet

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