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  • 12/29/2011

What poets say about love

part 20

love-vectors

From love’s weak childish bow she lives unharmed.

        Romeo and Juliet. Act I. Sc. 1. (“Uncharmed”‌ instead of “unharmed”‌ in Folio and early ed.)              351

Love is a smoke rais’d with the fume of sighs;

Being purg’d, a fire sparkling in a lover’s eyes;

Being vex’d, a sea nourish’d with lovers’ tears:

What is it else? a madness most discreet,

A choking gall and a preserving sweet.

        Romeo and Juliet. Act I. Sc. 1. L. 196.    352

Steal love’s sweet bait from fearful hooks.

        Romeo and Juliet. Act I. Sc. 5. Chorus at end. (Not in Folio.)    353

Speak but one rhyme, and I am satisfied;

Cry but””“Ay me!”‌ pronounce but “love”‌ and “dove.”‌

        Romeo and Juliet. Act II. Sc. 1. L. 9.       354

See, how she leans her cheek upon her hand!

O, that I were a glove upon that hand,

That I might touch that cheek!

        Romeo and Juliet. Act II. Sc. 2. L. 23.     355

O, Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou, Romeo?

        Romeo and Juliet. Act II. Sc. 2. L. 33.     356

For stony limits cannot hold love out,

And what love can do that dares love attempt.

        Romeo and Juliet. Act II. Sc. 2. L. 67.     357

        At lovers’ perjuries,

They say, Jove laughs.

        Romeo and Juliet. Act II. Sc. 2. L. 92.     358

My bounty is as boundless as the sea,

My love as deep; the more I give to thee

The more I have, for both are infinite.

        Romeo and Juliet. Act II. Sc. 2. L. 133.   359

Love goes toward love as school-boys from their books,

But love from love, toward school with heavy looks.

        Romeo and Juliet. Act II. Sc. 2. L. 157.   360

It is my soul that calls upon my name;

How silver-sweet sound lovers’ tongues by night,

Like soft music to attending ears.

        Romeo and Juliet. Act II. Sc. 2. L. 165.   361

’Tis almost morning; I would have thee gone:

And yet no further than a wanton’s bird;

Who lets it hop a little from her hand,

Like a poor prisoner in his twisted gyves,

And with a silk thread plucks it back again,

So loving-jealous of his liberty.

        Romeo and Juliet. Act II. Sc. 2. L. 177.   362

        Love’s heralds should be thoughts,

Which ten times faster glide than the sun’s beams,

Driving back shadows over louring hills;

Therefore do nimble-pinion’d doves draw love,

And therefore hath the wind-swift Cupid wings.

        Romeo and Juliet. Act II. Sc. 5. L. 4.       363

Therefore love moderately; long love doth so;

Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.

        Romeo and Juliet. Act II. Sc. 6. L. 14.     364

Give me my Romeo; and, when he shall die,

Take him, and cut him out in little stars,

And he will make the face of heaven so fine,

And all the world will be in love with night,

And pay no worship to the garish sun.

        Romeo and Juliet. Act III. Sc. 2. L. 21.   365

Love’s not Time’s fool, though rosy lips and cheeks

  Within his bending sickle’s compass come;

Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,

  But bears it out even to the edge of doom.

        Sonnet CXVI.       366

  They say all lovers swear more performance than they are able, and yet reserve an ability that they never perform.

        Troilus and Cressida. Act III. Sc. 2. L. 91.          367

            For to be wise, and love

Exceeds man’s might; that dwells with gods above.

        Troilus and Cressida. Act III. Sc. 2. L. 163.        368

The noblest hateful love that e’er I heard of.

        Troilus and Cressida. Act IV. Sc. 1. L. 33.          369

O spirit of love! how quick and fresh art thou,

That notwithstanding thy capacity

Receiveth as the sea, nought enters there,

Of what validity and pitch soe’er,

But falls into abatement and low price,

Even in a minute!

        Twelfth Night. Act I. Sc. 1. L. 9.             370

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