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  • Date :
  • 5/12/2009

Yoghurt keeps postpartum obesity away

yoghur

While many women find weight loss after labor challenging, a new study says probiotic supplements can easily help them retain their figure.

Previous studies had linked taking probiotics, live bacteria or yeast dietary supplements, to improved digestion and intestinal health.

According to the study presented at the 17th European Congress on Obesity in Amsterdam, taking these supplements in the first trimester of pregnancy can lower the risk of post-partum central obesity.

Women who took probiotics during pregnancy were reported to have the lowest levels of central obesity and body fat percentage in the year after delivery.

These supplements not only modify the bacteria in the intestines but also influence adipose formation in the body through breaking down sugars and carbohydrates.

A probiotics-supplemented diet during pregnancy and breastfeeding is therefore considered as an economic, practical, and potentially safe method for reducing the risk of obesity after labor.

University of Turku researchers concluded that just one yoghurt cup a day is enough to help pregnant women control their weight.


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