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  • 5/25/2005

The HADIQATUL- HAQIQAT

(THE WALLED GARDEN OF THE TRUTH)

HAKIM ABUL-MAJD MAJDUD SANA'I OF QAZNAYN

EDITED AND TRANSLATED BY J. STEPHENSON, [1910]

The Hadiqatul-Haqiqat, or the"Enclosed Garden of the Truth", commonly called theHadiqa, is a poem of about 11,500 lines; each line consists of two hemistiches, each of ten or eleven syllables; the bulk, therefore, is equal to about 23,000 lines of English ten-syllabled verse. It is composed in the meter ### which may be represented thus:

The two hemistiches of each verse rhyme; and the effect may therefore roughly be compared to that of English rhymed couplets with the accent falling on the first (instead of the second) syllable of the line, and, occasionally, an additional short syllable introduced in the last foot.

The chapters of which theHadiqa consists treat, according to a few lines of verse at the end of the table of contents in the Lucknow edition, of the following subjects:

The First

, on the Praise of God, and especially on His Unity;The Second, in praise of Muhammad;

The Third

, on the Understanding;The Fourth, on Knowledge;

The Fifth

, on Love, the Lover, and the Beloved;The Sixth, on Heedlessness;

The Seventh

, on Friends and Enemies,The Eighth, on the Revolution of the Heavens;

The Ninth

, in praise of the Emperor Shah jahaan;The Tenth, on the characters or qualities of the whole work.

This, however, is not the actual arrangement of the work as presented in the volume itself; the first five chapters are as already given, but the Sixth concerns the Universal Soul; the Seventh is on Heedlessness; the Eighth on the Stars; the Ninth on Friends and Enemies; the Tenth on many matters, including the praise of the Emperor. Prof. Browne (Lit. Hist. Persia, vol. ii., p. 318) gives still another order, apparently that of an edition lithographed at Bombay in A.H. 1275 (A.D. 1859).

Sana'i's fame has always rested on hisHadiqa; it is the best known and in the East by far the most esteemed of his works; it is in virtue of this work that he forms one of the great trio of Sufî teachers,--Sana'i, Attar, Rumi.

* Abbreviations

Ø      ON THE KNOWLEDGE OF GOD

Ø      ON THE ASSERTION OF THE UNITY

Ø      ON GOD AS FIRST CAUSE

Ø      ON PURITY OF HEART

Ø      ON THE BLIND MEN AND THE AFFAIR OF THE ELEPHANT

Ø      ON THE ABOVE ALLEGORY

Ø      OF THOSE WHO HEED NOT

Ø      ON THE STEPS OF ASCENT

Ø      ON THE PROTECTION AND GUARDIANSHIP OF GOD

Ø      THE PARABLE OF THOSE WHO GIVE ALMS

Ø      ON THE CAUSE OF OUR MAINTENANCE

Ø      OF THE RIGHT GUIDANCE

Ø      ON THE SURRENDER OF THE SELF

Ø      IN HIS MAGNIFICATION

Ø      ON THE EARNEST STRIVING

Ø      OF THE TRAVELLER ON THE PATH

Ø      ON BEING SILENT

Ø      THE PARABLE OF THOSE WHO HEED NOT

Ø      THE PARABLE OF THE EYE OF THE SQUINT-EYED

Ø      AGAIN THE PARABLE OF THOSE WHO HEED NOT

Ø      IN PRAISE OF HIS OMNIPOTENCE

Ø      ON THE PROVERBS AND ADMONITIONS 'POVERTY IS BLACKNESS OF THE FACE' (THE RECITAL OF PROVERBS IS THE BEST OF DISCOURSES) AND 'THE WORLD IS A HOUSE OF DEPARTURE AND CHANGING AFFAIRS AND MIGRATION'

Ø      ON THE NEED OF GOD, AND INDEPENDENCE OF ALL BESIDE HIM

Ø      ON SELF-ABASEMENT AND HUMILITY

Ø      ON THE JUSTICE OF THE PRINCE AND THE SECURITY OF HIS SUBJECTS

Ø      ON CELEBRATING THE PRAISE OF GOD

Ø      CONCERNING THE PIOUS DISCIPLE AND THE GREAT MASTER

Ø      CONCERNING THE HOUSE OF DECEPTION

To be continued …

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