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  • 12/20/2003

1-Modern Philosophy of Language


Maria Baghramian


Publisher Comments:
Modern Philosophy of Language brings together the most significant writings on language in twentieth-century philosophy -- from the work of Gottlob Frege, Bertrand Russell, and the logical positivists to the contemporary contributions of W.V.O. Quine, Noam Chomsky, and Michael Dummett. The articles collected here are bench-
marks in the development of various strands in the modern analytic philosophy of language.

Synopsis:
Modern Philosophy of Language brings together the most significant writings on language in twentieth-century philosophy -- from the work of Gottlob Frege, Bertrand Russell, and the logical positivists to the contemporary contributions of W.V.O. Quine, Noam Chomsky, and Michael Dummett. The articles collected here are bench-marks in the development of various strands in the modern analytic philosophy of language.
Book News Annotation:
Baghramian (philosophy, U. College, Dublin) compiles the seminal writings on the linguistic turn of philosophy that began at the beginning of the 20th century. They trace the developments and trends from Gottlob Frege and Bertrand Russell through such thinkers as Ludwig Wittgenstein and Noam Chomsky to Tyler Burge and Ruth Garrett Millikan. The anthology was originally published in 1998 by J. M. Dent,London.


2-The Philosophy of Language
Aloysius Martinich (Editor)

Synopsis
An introduction to such fundamental questions as: What is meaning? How is linguistic communication possible? What is the nature of language? What is the relation between language and the world? And how do metaphors work? The volume collects 41 of the most important articles in the field. Selections include classic articles by such distinguished philosophers as Gottlob Frege, Bertrand Russell, J.L. Austin, W.V.O Quine and P.F. Strawson, as well as more influential work by Saul Kripke, David Kaplan, Donald Davidson, John Searle, and Noam Chomsky. (For this fourth edition, the editor has added articles by John Stuart Mill, Russell, Searle, John Perry, and Millikan). The selections represent evolving and varying approaches to the subject, with many articles building upon earlier ones or critically discussing them. This textbook is intended for use in upper-level undergraduate and some graduate courses in the philosophy of language.

3-A Companion to the Philosophy of Language
 (Blackwell Companions to Philosophy)

Bob Hale (Editor),Crispin Wright (Editor),Robert Hale (Editor)

About the Author
Bob Hale is Professor of Metaphysical Philosophy at the University ofGlasgow. His philosophical interests lie mainly in the philosophy of mathematics and the philosophy of logic and language, and he has written numerous articles in all of these areas. He is also author of Abstract Objects (Blackwell Publishers, 1997). Crispin Wright is Professor of Logic and Metaphysics at theUniversity ofSt Andrews. He has published widely in the philosophy of mathematics, logic and language including Frege's Conception of Numbers as Objects (1983), Truth and Objectivity (1992), and Realism, Meaning, and Truth, Second Edition (Blackwell Publishers, 1993).

Book Description
Written by an international assembly of leading philosophers, this volume provides a survey of contemporary philosophy of language. As well as providing a synoptic view of the key issues, figures, concepts and debates, each essay makes new and original contributions to ongoing debate. Topics covered include: rule following, modality, realism, indeterminacy of translation, inscrutability of reference, names and rigid destination, Davidson's program, meaning and verification, intention and convention, radical interpretation, tacit knowledge, metaphor, causal theories of semantics, objects and criteria of identity, theories of truth, force and pragmatics, essentialism, demonstratives, reference and necessity, identity, meaning and privacy of language, vagueness and the sorties paradox, holisms, propositional attitudes, analyticity.

4-Readings in the Philosophy of Language


Peter Ludlow (Editor)


Synopsis
Throughout the history of ideas, various branches of philosophy have spun off into the natural sciences, including physics, biology, and perhaps most recently, cognitive psychology. A central theme of this collection is that the philosophy of language, at least a core portion of it, has matured to the point where it is now being spun off into linguistic theory. Each section of the book contains historical (20th-century) readings and, where available, recent attempts to apply the resources of contemporary linguistic theory to the problems under discussion. This approach helps to root the naturalization project in the leading questions of analytic philosophy. Although the older readings predate the current naturalization project, they help to lay its conceptual foundations. The main sections of the book, each of which is preceded by an introduction, are Language and Meaning, Logical Form and Grammatical Form, Descriptions, Names, Demonstratives, and Attitude Reports. The collection is not intended as a final report on a mature line of philosophical inquiry. Rather, its purpose is to show students what doing real philosophy is all about and to let them share in the excitement as philosophers enter a period in which how philosophy of language is conducted, could change in fundamental ways.


About the Author
Peter Ludlow is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

Book Description
"This is easily the finest collection of essays in the philosophy of language assembled for students, for undergaduate or graduate students. There is not even a close second competitor." -- Ernie Lepore, Associate Director, Center for Cognitive Science (RuCCS),
RutgersUniversity

"This is easily the best anthology in the philosophy of language; it is certain to become the standard textbook for years to come" -- Stephen Neale, Professor of Philosophy, Birkbeck College, University of London, and the University of California, Berkeley.

Throughout the history of ideas, various branches of philosophy have spun off into the natural sciences, including physics, biology, and perhaps most recently, cognitive psychology. A central theme of this collection is that the philosophy of language, at least a core portion of it, has matured to the point where it is now being spun off into linguistic theory. Each section of the book contains historical (twentieth-century) readings and, where available, recent attempts to apply the resources of contemporary linguistic theory to the problems under discussion. This approach helps to root the naturalization project in the leading questions of analytic philosophy. Although the older readings predate the current naturalization project, they help to lay its conceptual foundations. The main sections of the book, each of which is preceded by an introduction, are Language and Meaning, Logical Form and Grammatical Form, Descriptions, Names, Demonstratives, and Attitude Reports.

The collection is not intended as a final report on a mature line of philosophical inquiry. Rather, its purpose is to show students what doing real philosophy is all about and to let them share in the excitement as philosophers enter a period in which how philosophy of language is conducted could change in fundamental ways.

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