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  • 9/13/2003

David Herbert Lawrence

 (1885-1930)

David Herbert Lawrence was born on September 11, 1885, in Eastwood, Nottinghamshire, to a coal-mining father he could sometimes despise and a mother whom he revered. Later Lawrence wrote about his life with them in Sons and Lovers. After his education, he taught at Eastwood School, and then in Ilkeston, Derbyshire, before obtaining a teaching certificate from Nottingham University College in 1908. He then became junior assistant master atDavidson Road School in Croydon until 1911, when he renounced teaching and determined to live as a writer.In 1914, he got married his ex professor’s wife and settled inEngland. He led a harried life in England during World War I because of his wife’s German origin and his opposition to the war. In 1919, due to his getting tuberculosis, he began a period of restless wandering to find a more healthful environment. He traveled all over, from the United States to the Mediterranean region. He led a harried life in England during World War I because of his wife’s German origin and his opposition to the war. In 1919, due to his getting tuberculosis, he began a period of restless wandering to find a more healthful environment. He traveled all over, from the United States to the Mediterranean region.From 1926,Lawrence lived chiefly inItaly, where he write and rewrote his most notorious novel, Lady Chatterley’s Lover. It brought much controversy as it was suppressed in both the United States and England till 1959.

Lawrence is best known as a novelist for works such as The White Peacock (1911), Sons and Lovers (1913), The Rainbow (1915), Women in Love (1920), The Lost Girl (1920), Aaron's Rod (1922), Kangaroo (1923), The Plumed Serpent (1926), Lady Chatterley's Lover (1928), and The Virgin and the Gypsy (1930). He also published volumes of short stories, plays, travel stretches, and critical books such as Psychoanalysis and the Unconscious (1921), Studies in Classic American Literature (1923), and Pornography and Obscenity (1929). His paintings were exhibited in London in 1929. After many years fighting tuberculosis,Lawrence died on March 2, 1930, in Venice, France.

Taken from:
http://www.eliterature.com.ar/Lawrence

For more information:
http://eir.library.utoronto.ca/rpo/display/poet196.html
http://elibrary.fultus.com/mergedProjects/Lawrence,%20David%20Herbert%20(1885-1930)/david_herbert_lawrence_(1885-1930).htm
http://etext.library.adelaide.edu.au/aut/lawrence_dh.html
http://www.yudev.com/mfo/britlit/lawrence_david_herbert.htm

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