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  • Counter :
  • 1146
  • Date :
  • 4/25/2011

Spring Allergies and Simple Tips to Manage it

spring allergies _sneezing

Spring is the time of year that we normally think of when it comes to seasonal allergies. As the trees start to bloom and the pollen gets airborne, allergy sufferers begin their annual ritual of sniffling and sneezing.

Although there is no magical cure for spring allergies, there are a number of ways to combat them, from medication to household habits.

What causes spring allergies?

The biggest spring allergy trigger is pollen -- tiny grains released into the air by trees, grasses, and weeds for the purpose of fertilizing other plants. When pollen grains get into the nose of someone who’s allergic, they send the immune system into overdrive.

The immune system, mistakenly seeing the pollen as foreign invaders, releases antibodies -- substances that normally identify and attack bacteria, viruses, and other illness-causing organisms. The antibodies attack the allergens, which leads to the release of chemicals called histamines into the blood. Histamines trigger the runny nose, itchy eyes, and other symptoms of allergies.

Pollen can travel for miles, spreading a path of misery for allergy sufferers along the way. The higher the pollen count, the greater the misery. The pollen count measures the amount of allergens in the air in grains per cubic meter. You can find out the daily pollen count in your area by watching your local weather forecast.

Here are some of the biggest spring allergy offenders:

Trees

Alder

Ash

Aspen

Beech

Box elder

Cedar

Cottonwood

Cypress

Elm

Hickory

Juniper

Maple

Mulberry

Oak

Olive

 Palm

Pine

 Poplar

Sycamore

Willow

Grasses and weeds

 Bermuda

Fescue

Johnson

June

Orchard

Perennial rye

Redtop

Saltgrass

Sweet vernal

Timothy

 Allergy symptoms tend to be particularly high on breezy days when the wind picks up pollen and carries it through the air. Rainy days, on the other hand, cause a drop in the pollen counts because the rain washes away the allergens.

spring allergies _sneezing

What are the symptoms of spring allergies?

The symptoms of spring allergies include:

Runny nose, Watery eyes, Sneezing Coughing, Itchy eyes and nose Dark circles under the eyes airborne allergens also can trigger asthma, a condition in which the airways narrow, making breathing difficult and leading to coughing, wheezing, and shortness of breath.

 

How are spring allergies diagnosed?

If you’ve never been formally diagnosed with spring allergies but you notice that your eyes and nose are itchy and runny during the spring months, see your doctor. Your doctor may refer you to an allergist for tests.

The allergy specialist may do a skin test, which involves injecting a tiny sample of a diluted allergen just under the skin of your arm or back. If you’re allergic to the substance, a small red bump (called a wheal or hive) will form. Another diagnostic option is the radioallergosorbent test or RAST. RAST is a blood test that detects antibody levels to a particular allergen. Just because you are sensitive to a particular allergen on a test, though, doesn’t mean that you’ll necessarily start sneezing and coughing when you come into contact with it.

How to manage spring allergies

It’s nearly impossible to completely avoid spring allergies if you live in an area where plants grow. However, you can ease sniffling, sneezing, and watery eyes by avoiding your main allergy triggers. Here are a few tips.

• Try to stay indoors whenever the pollen count is very high (pollen counts usually peak in the mornings).

• Keep your doors and windows closed whenever possible during the spring months to keep allergens out. An air purifier may also help.

• Clean the air filters in your home often. Also, clean bookshelves, vents, and other places where pollen can collect.

• Wash your hair after going outside, because pollen can collect there.

• Vacuum twice a week. Wear a mask because vacuuming can kick up pollen, mold, and dust that were trapped in your carpet.

Source: rafed.net


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