• Counter :
  • 1044
  • Date :
  • 9/30/2009

How Parents can help to foster healthy self-esteem in a child?

father & child

How can a parent help to foster healthy self-esteem in a child? These tips can make a big difference:

• Watch what you say. Kids are very sensitive to parents' words. Remember to praise your child not only for a job well done, but also for effort. But be truthful. For example, if your child doesn't make the soccer team, avoid saying something like, ‘Well, next time you'll work harder and make it.’ Instead, try ‘Well, you didn't make the team, but I'm really proud of the effort you put into it.’ Reward effort and completion instead of outcome.

• Be a positive role model.

If you're excessively harsh on yourself, pessimistic, or unrealistic about your abilities and limitations, your child may eventually mirror you. Nurture your own self-esteem, and your child will have a great role model.

• Identify and redirect your child's inaccurate beliefs. It's important for parents to identify kids' irrational beliefs about themselves, whether they're about perfection, attractiveness, ability, or anything else. Helping kids set more accurate standards and be more realistic in evaluating themselves will help them have a healthy self-concept. Inaccurate perceptions of self can take root and become reality to kids. For example, a child who does very well in school but struggles with math may say, ‘I can't do math. I'm a bad student.’ Not only is this a false generalization, it's also a belief that will set the child up for failure. Encourage kids to see a situation in its true light. A helpful response might be: ‘You are a good student. You do great in school. Math is just a subject that you need to spend more time on. We'll work on it together.’

• Be spontaneous and affectionate. Your love will go a long way to boost your child's self-esteem. Give hugs and tell kids you're proud of them. Pop a note in your child's lunchbox that reads, ‘I think you're terrific!’ Give praise frequently and honestly, without overdoing it. Kids can tell whether something comes from the heart.

• Give positive, accurate feedback. Comments like ‘You always work yourself up into such a frenzy!’ will make kids feel like they have no control over their outbursts. A better statement is, ‘You were really mad at your brother. But I appreciate that you didn't yell at him or hit him.’ This acknowledges a child's feelings, rewards the choice made, and encourages the child to make the right choice again next time.

• Create a safe, loving home environment. Kids who don't feel safe or are abused at home will suffer immensely from low self-esteem. A child who is exposed to parents who fight and argue repeatedly may become depressed and withdrawn. Also watch for signs of abuse by others, problems in school, trouble with peers, and other factors that may affect kids' self-esteem. Deal with these issues sensitively but swiftly. And always remember to respect your kids.

• Help kids become involved in constructive experiences.

Activities that encourage cooperation rather than competition are especially helpful in fostering self-esteem. For example, mentoring programs in which an older child helps a younger one learn to read can do wonders for both kids.

Finding Professional Help

If you suspect your child has low self-esteem, consider professional help. Family and child counselors can work to uncover underlying issues that prevent a child from feeling good about himself or herself.

Therapy can help kids learn to view themselves and the world positively. When kids see themselves in a more realistic light, they can accept who they truly are.

With a little help, every child can develop healthy self-esteem for a happier, more fulfilling life.

mother & child

Source: kidshealth.org


Other links:

Developing Your Childs Self-Esteem

Weight loss should not be hurried in new moms

How many fruits and vegetables should my kids eat each day?

Ten Things To Hand Down To Your Daughter

Best Ways for Treating Women in Depression

Don’t Be Negative

Muslim Parents Attitude

Reading Books to Babies (part1)

Reading Books to Babies (part 2)

Female belly fat related to depression

Women in Depression

Islam, the Perfect Religion

Islam, the Perfect Religion

Islam, the Perfect Religion
When Its Just You After School (Part1)

When Its Just You After School (Part1)

When Its Just You After School (Part1)
Developing Your Childs Self-Esteem

Developing Your Childs Self-Esteem

Developing Your Childs Self-Esteem
Happy Parents = Happy Kids

Happy Parents = Happy Kids

Happy Parents = Happy Kids
  • Print

    Send to a friend

    Comment (0)